Way to Go Sarajevo


The oldest pyramid in the world is in… Bosnia

Who said there was nothing to do in Bosnia? An amateur archaeologist claims to have discovered pyramids in Bosnia, but scientists say that he is lying. Inhabitants of the small town at the foot of the pyramid believe him, but not necessarily for scientific reasons.

Amira Kilalić places pita bread on the table, wraps her headscarf tighter around her bright, dyed red hair, and steps outside. Her shop is a small wooden house that stands on the mountainside. If she looks down, the 83-year-old with a wrinkled face can see Visoko, the town at the foot of the Visočica mountain.

There, women wear high heels to fetch cigarettes, and in the mornings, the men are already sitting in the cafés and betting shops on the main street. If she looks up, Amira can see the castle ruins on the mountaintop.

That’s where the director of the town’s local history museum took a Bosnian entrepreneur, who visited Visoko in 2005. Back then, the ruins were the town’s only sightseeing destination. But when the director mentioned the symmetry of the mountain, his visitor stopped short, got out his compass, measured the angle of the mountain’s slopes and suddenly became certain that he was standing atop a pyramid.

Not just a mountain in Bosnia

For centuries, the mountain was just a mountain. It wasn’t until 2005, when the amateur researcher came to visit, that the mountain became “the highest and oldest pyramid in the world”. He called it the ‘Pyramid of the Sun’ (Piramida Sunca). At the time, the people of Visoko laughed and called him crazy. Today, they are proud of the find, which has brought them fame and money. “It’s so nice that the pyramid is right here,” Amira says, with a satisfied smile.

The discoverer is called Semir Osmanagić. He makes his living from a metal business in Texas, where he goes by the name Sam Osmanagich. For years, he used to visit the pyramids of the world in his spare time, wearing a wide-brimmed white hat and a cotton shirt. The 57-year-old says that since his discovery, he’s the happiest person in the world. His business has since become a side project; he visits the company four times a year, dealing with any problems over Skype. He can call himself Dr. Osmanagić because, in 2009, he wrote a PhD thesis about the Mayan civilisation at the faculty of political science in Sarajevo.

“I was here in July and took some tunnel water with me. I drank it regularly, and in October, it turned out that I’m free of tumours.”

To Amira, he is simply “Semir”. He began excavations in spring 2006. Every day while doing so, he came by her wooden house – which has neither heating nor a water supply – with his helpers. She gave them apples from her garden and observed how more and more Bosnians and foreigners with hiking boots and cameras were pouring in. When she counted over a thousand people one sunny weekend, her husband decided to open a café. They built a long timber house with a clay floor and large windows, from which Amira now sells coffee and homemade pita, woollen socks and smoked cheese.

Visiting Gobekli Tepe in 2016, led us to read “Magicians of the Gods” by Graham Hancock but the ‘Pyramid of the Sun’ in Sarajevo has put us on the occultist bus.


A place of pilgrimage for occultists

The pyramids create jobs, urgently needed in a country with an unemployment rate of almost 30%. Those who can tend to rent out rooms, sell souvenirs or earn money as taxi drivers for the tourists. Since 2005, around 100 new accommodation spaces have sprung up, and pyramid-shaped pizza is easy to find. Osmanagić even formed a Pyramid Foundation, financed by tourism revenue. The foundation employs 38 people: guides, craftspeople and guards. Osmanagić isn’t there very often though, he now gives talks around the world about his discovery. He manages the Visoko team via email.

The amateur archaeologist invites international excavation teams and journalists with him. On the pyramid’s slope, he has exposed stone slabs, and says they are man-made.

Even the head of the European Institute for Archaeology paid the site a visit. He said the find was “a pseudoscientific lie”, and that Osmanagić should stop digging. But the amateur researcher didn’t back down. Instead, he went on to discover three additional, smaller pyramids and a tunnel that – he believes – leads you to the Pyramid of the Sun. But the alleged passageways are still barricaded by stone.

Jane Marie “laying on of hands,” occultist style.

The accessible part of the tunnel is visited by around 45,000 tourists each year. “We witness miracles here: the highly ionised air in the tunnel, the extraordinary quality of the water, and the vibrations all have positive effects on people,” Osmanagić says over Skype. The entrance fee for foreigners is 10 Euros. There is tunnel water for sale in tiny 100ml glass bottles for the same price.


Six Handed Bridge


In the Shadows of a Presidency he offers a behind-the-scenes chronicle of the actors, governments, companies, and institutions involved in Trump’s election and the payout it will yield for insiders.

“Rank order your fellow platoon members by whom you would want on your left and right in a foxhole.” At the end of the 8th week in my stay at the US Marine Corps Officer Candidate School in scenic Quantico, Virginia, I searched the posted Peer Evaluation list for my name. There I was, #49 out of 50.

I had managed to avoid the wrath of the assistant platoon sergeant, the platoon sergeant and the platoon commander for seven weeks and four days but no longer. First the Captain, “Wadid’ya do, go to sum f****ng charm school? I’m going to send you to Paris Island!” Then the Major, ” I know your type, soon as 5 o’clock comes, you’re gone. I’m going to send you to Paris Island! Lastly the Colonel, “Obviously leadership is not in your DNA but with a degree in architecture you should be able to read maps, so we’re going to make you a Forward Observer in the artillery.”

War is hell but my two months above the tree line and below the snow was my introduction to communing with nature USMC style.

No Paris Island, no Vietnam, unless you count observing Danang while aboard the USS Point Defiance on our way to Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mt. Fuji, and Subic Bay. I observed that the “join the Navy and see the world” might be applicable to the civilian career overseas. Four years later I was making pretty sketches of factories in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Then God said, “Teg I found a copy of your OCS Peer Evaluation and because you have made a mockery of our Military-Industrial Complex, I’m going to send you to the civilian Paris Island – Cleveland, Ohio.”


The Battle of Ismailia took place between the Egyptian Army and the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) during the last stages of the Yom Kippur War during October 18–22, 1973, south of the city of Ismailia, on the west bank of the Suez Canal in Egypt

After six miserable winters and 500 resumes I got a job in May 1985, with USAID in Ismalia, Egypt. I was paid $600/day in 2019$$ to observe all 45 research stations of the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture to determine what the US government could do for them. Since, the chief of each location had a PhD and pulled down $50-100/month, their answer was, “go home and just give us the money.”

When I qualified for a CitiMortgage ‘liar’ loan that was three times my Social Security check, I soon found myself employed as an ESL teacher in Mainland China.
In 2011 Jane Marie came along and suggested we give up our subsistence level ESL gigs for life on the Turkish riviera.
Expat Heaven Antalya, Turkey

What’s Going On In America?

After 12 years of living/work experience under two military dictatorships, a Communist kleptocracy and an Islamic theocracy, I became a believer in Daniel Estulin’s analogy of the elites of six economic regions of at least 600 million inhabitants playing geo-politics like a game of six player Bridge .

Group 1: USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and possibly Mexico which would allow it to reach 600 million inhabitants. Currency – US Dollar.

Group 2: Russia divided by Urals into a Western Russia (Russia – Iran – Turkey – former Soviet Turkic speaking republics and regions – Azerbaijian, Turkmenistan, Karchay-Balkar, Kazakh, Karakalpak, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Altay, Kumyk, Chuvash, Nogay, Khakas, Tyvan, Tofa, Sakha also Syria and the Balkans) and Eastern Russia (Russia-South Korea-Japan-Central Asia), Iran would join the group with Russia and Turkey and with Yemen, Bahrain and the Shia part of Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia disappears as a country. Ruined economically, Saudi society would break into sectors separated by ethnicity. Currency – Ruble

Group 3: Latin America with South Africa. Currency – Peso.

Group 4: China. Or Japan with China if Japan cannot close the economic agreement with the Russia-South Korea cluster. China would simply absorb Japan because Japan is too small and too dependent on the natural resources of others. Currency – Yuan.

Group 5: India. Or Iran with India if Iran can not close its deal with the Russia-Turkey economic cluster. Currency – Rupee.

Group 6: Western Europe (axis Paris-Berlin) with France’s African colonies (resources + population). Currency – Euro?

Group 7: UK with Arab countries (from Morocco to Saudi Arabia). Before Trump’s election, this option means that Israel was in serious danger. No wonder, Arnold Toynbee, one of the most influential British historians, in the 60s said that Israel has a life span of no more than 75 years. Henry Kissinger and Rothschild warned 4 years ago that Israel is going to disappear by 2022. It has already served its usefulness. The Jews were going back to Crimea. Trump’s election changed the dynamic and the elite circles had to come up with plan B – Macron, as the President of France, as I explained earlier.

After reading Estulin’s “In the Shadow of a Presidency” I have to find the Mezuzah of the elites – its Harpocrates the Greek God of silencio, secrets & confidentiality.

After the elites had assassinated RFK Senator Edward Kennedy quoted Bobby’s favorite line from George Bernard Shaw’s ‘Back to Methuselah’You see things; and you say, “Why?” But I dream things that never were; and I say “Why not?”
`Curiouser and curiouser!’  In the play those words, are the words of the Devil.

Armenia – You Can’t Get There from Here


Gata is an Armenian sweet bread, often about 12-14″ in diameter and about 1.5″ thick. The inside is soft, chewy and very sweet. Gata is sold at most bakeries in Armenia, and can be purchased at small road-side stores and tourist attractions outside the cities. At Geghard Monastery the name “Geghard” is written in Armenian on the Gata.
Armenia has more cathedrals than McDonald’s – matter of fact. we didn’t see any big or little Mac’s
Monastery with a view at Lake Sevan
Walking tour of the Armenian Capital – wait, wait don’t tell me – Yerevan.
Yerevan is pre-gentrified interior upgrades only requirement for occupancy
Hostel rooms start at $3/day
Mountain & very tall hill retreats are everywhere. Thanks to Jane Marie’s research we were lucky guests at the Palma B&B high above Alaverdi
The four hour drive to Yerevan makes stops at three famous cathedrals, Sanahin was our favorite

Garni-Geghard-Pokr Vedi

Garni has a five time restored Greek temple, next to last time Emperor Nero wrote a check
in 66 AD
What I liked best about Garni was the Lavash bread hot out of a real tandoor oven.
I wanted to know if any of the Apostles had been to Geghard. No but Kim Kardashian and Kanye were here in 2015
Notice when they get back in their van the Gata bread take-out
Yes that’s Mt. Ararat, Kohr-Vepi in the foreground and the Russians guarding the valley border between Turkey and Armenia
Jane Marie befriending the path builder on her way to the Kohr-Vepi cathedral, where St,Gregory was imprisoned for twelve years.

Vagharshapat – Etchmiadzin

Etchmiadzin Cathedral the Vatican of the Armenian Apostolic Church
Offering unsolicited advise on oil painting landscapes, while Jane Marie checks out the
Etchmiadzin Cathedral in Vagharshapat, Armenia

Georgia On My Mind


Georgia, Georgia
The whole day through
Just an old sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind (Georgia on my mind)
I said Georgia

Hard to live in Turkey very long without visiting Tbilisi, Georgia
Jane Marie & I had a two-week educational, insightful, geo-social-political, and skilled Georgian home cooking stay with our new Family

Georgia Invented Wine


Georgia
A song of you
Comes as sweet and clear
As moonlight through the pines
Other arms reach out to me
Other eyes smile tenderly
Still in peaceful dreams I see
The road leads back to you


Chateau Mukhrani, most entertaining winery in Georgia, with US & European wine aficionados serenaded by Georgian folk music.
Clay pots with removable tops, so the wine guy/girl can push the grape stuff to the bottom every so often to let it ferment back up, so he/she can push it down again.
Georgio, our fast-talking guide, showing off Chateau’s stainless steel lined concrete shell experimental clay pot.

Jane Marie’s Tbilisi Pics


I said Georgia
Ooh Georgia, no peace I find
Just an old sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind (Georgia on my mind)
Other arms reach out to me
Other eyes smile tenderly
Still in peaceful dreams I see
The road leads back to you
Whoa, Georgia


According to legend, the city of Tbilisi was first founded in the mid-5th century by King Vakhtang Gorgasali, who encountered numerous hot springs while hunting in the area and was so impressed by them he decreed that a new city be built on the site. The water still runs clear, so much so that you can drink out of the tap.
Tbilisi is another great place to invest your Gentrification dollar
Tbilisi Tartar Vegan antidote
Freedom Bridge good, Fallopian tubes interesting as a curiosity
Nexus carpet shop – Persian, Armenian & Georgian and bring cash
Intelligentsia Graffiti
Foot-long cheese or bean burrito blast furnace bakery on every corner
Re-purposed Lada
Georgian equivalent of eggs Benedict
Best street art exhibit
Got to be one of the only places on earth where George ‘W’ and Dick Cheney are heroes.

Did you say Monastery?


Georgia
No peace, no peace I find
Just this old, sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind
I said just an old sweet song
Keeps Georgia on my mind
Songwriters: Hoagy Carmichael / Stuart Gorell
Georgia on My Mind lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

Jane Madonna Marie Kennedy and her Acolyte
Two hats are better than one at the Mtskheta Holy Cross Church
Svetitskhoveli Cathedral Spy
Jvari Monastery

Mainframe to Smartphone

Latest IBM mainframe computer $1,000,000

New World Order Decentralization

I designed the Data Operations center of the New Jersey National Bank in Ewing Township, NJ in 1979 which had a single IBM Mainframe at the time.


By 1978 Wang was the largest worldwide supplier of CRT word processing systems, with fifty thousand users. In a few years 80% of the 2,000 largest US firms had bought Wang equipment. At one time, it was said, every secretary in America swore by Wang products.


The girls from 18 to maybe 40, married the Wang 2200. The design, engineering & construction company employed 2,500 professionals 2,000 ‘gearheads’ and 500 architects. Our customers the big banks and the airlines had their IBM mainframes, the engineers had their mini-computers and the girls had the latest and greatest word processing technology. The architects? Well we still had our T-Squares & Triangles.

Back at our corporate office we had an HP 3000 mini-computer which the engineers used in mystic ways to do structural calcs and project scheduling.
Long about 1985 the California office rented a dozen Auto-Trol CAD machines, the leading edge in computer aided the design. Now everybody could throw away their T-Squares, triangles and even their drafting tables. Nope! Nobody over 20 knew how to use a graphics computer. High school kids took over and the AE&C professionals were too old to learn new tricks.


Around 1980, Bill Gates gave Microsoft, the company he founded, a clear mission: “A computer on every desk and in every home.”

Steve Ballmer (left) and Bill Gates, both from Microsoft, speak next to a fountain at the annual PC Forum, Phoenix, Arizona, February 16-19, 1986. (Photo by Ann E. Yow-Dyson/Getty Images)

Having graduated from high school in 1961 and architecture in 1968, I got a positive response from USAID to be a Computer Construction Management consultant to the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture. The fact that I didn’t know anything about agriculture, a little about construction in the field and not sure what to do after I turned the computer on, were merely details. I did reference my design of the New Jersey National Bank computer operations center.

When, in 1985, I witnessed the MOA secretary, typing in Arabic from right to left, on her IBM PC MS DOS operating system, I saw the Prophet Bill Gates vision: “A computer on every desk and in every home.” was just around the 1995 introduction of AOL.


There are about 2 billion smartphones in the world today and that is set to rise to 6 billion by 2020. 6 billion smartphones represents huge computational capacity, and often that capacity is underutilized. While worries are growing that we are ‘addicted to’ or ‘overusing’ or smartphones, the fact of the matter is that are smartphones spend most of their existence in our pocket, in a bag or on a table somewhere. Cars are an analogous example. During their lifetime, cars spend 95% of their time parked and only 5% of their time actually driving.
But why is this important? While we are producing more data than ever, we’re struggling to analyze much of it. According to a recent EMC report, only 1% of data produced is every analyzed but 37% of data would be useful to analyze. Increasing our processing power by leveraging smartphone downtime would go a long way to making data analysis faster and more efficient. The idea is based on the concept of distributed computing. A distributed system is a group of interconnected computers working towards the same goals. A distributed system can divided tasks between these different computers to help get work done faster and more efficiently.

Power to the people now everyone can have an IBM Mainframe in their pocket with access to the Cloud. The New World Order is controlled by the end user, deciding what they want to see, hear, and do.

Look, There’s a White Guy on the Roof!

On a new homes sales interview in Amarillo, my prospective employer was driving  us through his subdivision, when I spotted this white guy working on the roof of a home under construction. In Houston, in my four years and 100+ sales of new homes, I never, ever saw a white guy on a roof. My fellow sales counselors were white, black and a lonely Puerto Rican. The construction managers were white college graduates with a sprinkling of blacks. The people who built the homes from the ground up were Mexican illegals working for legal Salvadorian/Mexican owners.  Immigration and Naturalization Service, the precursor to ICE would periodically raid a subdivision and scatter the entire workforce – I guess Amarillo was a sanctuary city for white construction workers.

I talked with a cement finisher who had been in Texas for over six years, still making only $5.00/hr. I bribed Abundio Laredo away from his 11 hours a day, six days and $500 a week  meat cutter job at the Chinese restaurant, to milk our cows and goats for $15.00/hr. And yes, there is no way to make an illegal, legal in the USA – “There is no controlling legal authority ….” – Al Gore

FREE THE MINIMUM WAGE SLAVES

Walmart employs an astounding 2.1 million people.  In the United States alone, the company employs 1.4 million people.  This is a staggering 1% of the U.S.’s 140 million working population.

Walmart, in other words, matters. Its payrolls, and its pay, move the needle. And right now, many people argue, Walmart is very much part of the problem.

The average Walmart “associate,” Wake Up Walmart reports, makes $11.75 an hour. That’s $20,744 per year. Those wages are slightly below the national average for retail employees, which is $12.04 an hour. They also produce annual earnings that, in a one-earner household, are below the $22,000 poverty line.

On the other hand, these wages are far above minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. They also aren’t THAT FAR below the national retail average (only 2.5% below). In a two-earner household, moreover, these wages would produce a household income of $40,000+, which, in some areas of the country, is comfortably middle-class.  Walmart offers benefits to some of its employees, as well as store discounts and profit-sharing plans.

Small businesses are Big business

Employees per establishment in the U.S. coffee and snack shops industry from 2002 to 2016 was 9.51There are roughly 130 million U.S. workers employed by small businesses.

  • Represent more than 99.7% of all employers
  • Employ half of all private-sector workers and 39% of workers in high-tech jobs
  • Provide 60% to 80% of the net new jobs annually
  • Pay 44.3% of total U.S. private payroll
  • Produce more than 50% of non-farm private gross domestic product, or a GDP of roughly $6 trillion
  • 3% are franchises

Source: SBA, “Small Business by the Numbers,” June 2004

Prior to 1950 eighty percent of the population was self-employed – down on the farm. Today 98% live in urban areas that employ 90 million in the service sector and only 12 million in manufacturing. Adam Smith divided the employment world into Farmers-Merchants-Manufacturers. Farmers were the most important because they were the only ones who produced more than they consumed – it’s the one, two, three baby analogy. If a nation’s birthrate falls below 2.3, without immigration they’ll eventually go out of business.

Farmers, as long as they take care of the soil, can make 3 babies (grow more foodstuffs than they consume) every year to infinity. Merchants (Service Sector) don’t make any babies and Manufacturers make orphans that can’t reproduce. So, Houston what we have here is a big, big problem.

Family business farming before 1950

Small businesses (really family businesses, Sam Walton might have had 9.51 employees in his Dime Store) have always represented 99.7% of all employers, only by the end of WWII 80% of them still lived in the country.  Worse yet, now the Merchants & Manufacturers have occupied rural America. In 1950 there were 12 million farmers, each raising an average of 200 pigs. Today there are 200 farmers each raising 2 million pigs.

THE CIVIL WAR WAS ABOUT SLAVE WAGES

Henry Ford gave everybody $5.00/day instead of the standard two-twenty-five, “so his employees could afford to buy a car.” WRONG! Ford didn’t raise wages so that his workers could afford his cars. What happened is that he hired and then lost some 52,000 workers a year in order to have a stable workforce of 14,000. This obviously had vast costs in trying to hire and then train all of these workers: as well as the costs when they walked off the assembly line disrupting production. The doubling of wages to $5 a day reduced those costs by more than the extra pay cost him. Which is why he did it. Ford had to hire 52,000 a year to keep 14,000 for a turnover of 370%. Retailers today range from 150-300% turnover. Each entry level new hire costs at least $2,000 to replace the dear departed. What really hurts is how much a May 25, 2014 five-dollar bill is worth today, $118.26 to be exact. Those poor turds were running in off the farm to get $14.72 an hour on the assembly line.

The biggest difference between workers in RTW and non-RTW states is the fact that workers in non-RTW states are more than twice as likely (2.4 times) to be in a union or protected by a union contract. Average hourly wages, the primary variable of interest, are 15.8 percent higher in non-RTW states ($23.93 in non-RTW states versus $20.66 in RTW states). Median wages are 16.6 percent higher in non-RTW states ($18.40 vs. $15.79).

COOL SLAVES

So, the rest of the wage story of America had the unions driving manufacturing from the rust belt to the sun belt. The three or four dollars an hour wage difference didn’t hold a candle to 15 cents an hour in Mexico and of course there was China. Which came first Wal-Mart or China. All recovering Yankees that weren’t nailed down moved to Atlanta, Houston & Dallas. After 2008 nobody but nobody could get a job for more than the $7.25/hr. MINIMUM and Wal-Mart became the employer of last resort.

DEFINITELY NOT COOL SLAVES

As a 14-month veteran of Richmond-Rosenberg’s Wal-Mart Tire, Lube, Express it takes a lot of humility and quasi-permanent damage to your self-esteem to work at Wal-Mart. I cannot list a single redeeming feature; on the contrary working at Wal-Mart is hazardous to your mental health.

THE SOLUTION

Legalize Immigration

There are 20 million plus, not 11 million, Abundio’s working for real slave wages because the slave labor supply to nationalized ratio is at least three times greater than when Lincoln ran the show. Build the Wall – issue federal photo ID cards – write the law

 Eliminate All Subsidies and Tariffs

New Zealand did it 20 years ago and agriculture thrived. Absolutely no adverse consequences, only innovation and the benefits of a healthier food supply.

Reset World Reserve Currency to Gold Standard

US trade deficits were flat until Tricky Dick pulled the plug on Gold. Our 1998, 80 cents a pound goats are now worth $2.50/lb. According to the CPI calculator 80 centavos in ’98 is worth $1.25 in 2018, giving the self-employed goat farmer a $1.25/lb wage increase or shall we say, profit.

The Day the Rabbi Came to Visit

I had several Jewish family customers for our raw dairy products. One Orthodox lady asked if her Rabbi could make a farm visit? Sure, send him out.

Fortunately we weren’t raising pigs but we had about 40 bunny-rabbits running around. What’s not to like about rabbits? Our Texas Department of Health inspector’s only concern was keeping the chickens out of the milking parlor. I knew that Jews don’t eat pork because the pig has a cloven hoof but doesn’t chew his cud. Well, a rabbit has a cud but no cloven hoof.

At the end of the day, I was more informed on Kosher dietary traditions and the Rabbi gave us his seal of approval. A related incident occurred when an Indian lady wouldn’t buy our Chev and Feta cheese unless we used vegetarian rennet. It cost no more and the taste was the same, so we switched.

Owning a licensed Grade ‘A’ Raw Goat’s Milk dairy 50 miles outside of Houston, Texas is a great way to go broke, unless you can sell at the city farmers’ markets – $200 a week versus $4,000 a week. Twelve years after I abandoned the thrill of fighting city hall, to the best of my knowledge, California is the only state with retail raw dairy. One man, Mark McAfee, of Fresno based Organic Pastures  is the national spokesperson for raw dairy.

I had lost faith that the evils of industrialized agriculture could ever be rectified when Zerohedge posted this article by Black Swan author Nassim Taleb: 

The Most Intolerant Wins: Nassim Taleb Exposes The Dictatorship Of The Small Minority

This example of complexity hit me, ironically, as I was attending the New England Complex Systems institute summer barbecue. As the hosts were setting up the table and unpacking the drinks, a friend who was observant and only ate Kosher dropped by to say hello. I offered him a glass of that type of yellow sugared water with citric acid people sometimes call lemonade, almost certain that he would reject it owing to his dietary laws. He didn’t. He drank the liquid called lemonade, and another Kosher person commented: “liquids around here are Kosher”. We looked at the carton container. There was a fine print: a tiny symbol, a U inside a circle, indicating that it was Kosher. The symbol will be detected by those who need to know and look for the minuscule print. As to others, like myself, I had been speaking prose all these years without knowing, drinking Kosher liquids without knowing they were Kosher liquids.

” It suffices for an intransigent minority –a certain type of intransigent minorities –to reach a minutely small level, say three or four percent of the total population, for the entire population to have to submit to their preferences.”

The vegetarian population in the US 3.2 percent of  adults, or 7.3 million people, follow a vegetarian-based diet. The Jewish population about 4 million or 1.4%. So, there you have it the intransigent minorities are about to tip the scales in favor of real  food.

Kate Clow Lives in the Hood

My Queen of Diamonds friend was paying her first visit to our home, when she recognized that Kate Clow, founder of the Lycian coast trail lived in the neighborhood, We thought living next door to the mayor was pretty impressive but who is Kate Clow?

       

Kate Clow lived in the UK until 1989, when she took a job selling computer systems in Istanbul. In 1992, she moved to Antalya and started freelance work. This gave her scope to explore ancient roads, which form networks linking the centers of ancient civilizations of Turkey. Convinced that Turkey needed long distance walking routes, she connected a series of old roads to make Turkey’s first long distance walking path, the Lycian Way.

The ancient region of Lycia is now famous for walking, hiking, trekking, whichever! The establishment of the Lycian Way, Turkey’s first long distance footpath was set up during the nineties by Kate Clow an ex-pat residing in Antalya. The project won a conservation competition set up by the Garanti Bankasi and part of the prize was sponsoring the implementation of the route. Today people arrive from all over the world to hike the trail either independently or part of a package tour, bringing a boost to alternative tourism and local village economy.

Geographically, Lycia is a walker’s paradise with the limestone peaks of the Taurus Mountains sweeping down to a rugged shore of forested capes and secluded coves. Warm turquoise waters invite the intrepid trekker along coastal paths and ruins of ancient empires glorify the spectacular landscape. Snow melt gushes down narrow defiles to irrigate fertile plains and grazing goatherds define a biblical scene. Rock hewn paths connect forgotten cities and shepherd trails ascend to the ‘yayla’ summer pastures hidden amongst the mountain scree. Whether one wants to stroll through a meadow colored with red poppies or climb a ten thousand foot summit in snow and ice, Lycia has it all.

That 509 km translates to 300 miles, truth is if it was 3 mi we’d still go by car.  We went fours by bus from Antalya to Kas, Everybody must go to Kas, if it wasn’t 4 hours to the airport, we would move there.

Roy & Kay liked Demre, so much so, Roy had some kind of an epiphany viewing the tomb of Santa Claus, aka St. Nicholas. Those in the know say Finike is the place to be, only no expat’s going to brag on Facebook, they’ve been to FIN – e- Kuh.

We hired car/driver for almost 12 hours from Kas to Tlos (up at the top of the map under Taurus) for $75. Had to visit Tlos, home of Pegasus, but Patara, Xanthos, and Saklikent were way more interesting. Oh, when you come to visit, I want to take the ferry (25 minutes) from Kas to this little Greek island that starred in award winning Italian movie.

Healing from the Ground Up