HIPPIES, YIPPIES, YUPPIES & BUPPIES

According to Ed Sanders, the change in the public label from “beatnik” to “hippie” occurred after the 1967 Human Be-In in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, where Ginsberg,Gary Snyder, and Michael McClure led the crowd in chanting “Om”. Ginsberg was also at the infamous 1968 Democratic National Convention, and was friends with Abbie Hoffman and other members of the Chicago Seven. Stylistic differences between beatniks, marked by somber colors, dark shades and goatees, gave way to colorful psychedelic clothing and long hair worn by hippies. While the beats were known for “playing it cool” and keeping a low profile, hippies became known for displaying their individuality.

One early book hailed as evidencing the transition from “beatnik” to “hippie” culture, was Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me by Richard Fariña, brother-in-law of Joan Baez. Written in 1963, it was published April 28, 1966—two days before its author was killed in a motorcycle crash.

The Yippies had no formal membership or hierarchy. Abbie Hoffman, Anita Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Nancy Kurshan, and Paul Krassner founded the Yippies (according to his own account, Krassner coined the name) at a meeting in Abbie and Anita’s New York flat on December 31, 1967.[7] “If the press had created ‘hippie,’ could not we five hatch the ‘yippie’?” Abbie Hoffman wrote.

Anita Hoffman liked the word, but felt that the New York Times and other “strait-laced types” needed a more formal name to take the movement seriously. That same night she came up with Youth International Party, because it symbolized the movement and made for a good play on words. The Yippies held their first press conference in New York at the Americana Hotel March 17, 1968, five months before the August 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. 

‘Get Clean for Gene”

Sister Sue, upper left, Walnut Hills High School ’64, dropped out of Miami of Ohio to run away to Haight Ashbury, San Francisco to be a Hippie. She shared her life with a Buppie but ventured to DC where she met her future husband John, front with baby. John was a Yippie at heart campaigning for Eugene McCarthy in he 1968 election. John retired from Yuppie-hood in 2012 as president of St. Charles Community College.

Jerry Rubin, the Yippie, Walnut Hills High School ’56 dropped out of UC Berkeley to be a full time socio-political activist.

Kenneth Elton “Ken” Kesey (/ˈkz/; September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American novelist, essayist, and countercultural figure. He considered himself a link between the Beat Generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s.

Kesey was born in La Junta, Colorado and grew up in Springfield, Oregon, graduating from the University of Oregon in 1957. He began writing One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest in 1960 following the completion of a graduate fellowship in creative writing at Stanford University; the novel was an immediate commercial and critical success when published two years later.