The Day the Rabbi Came to Visit

I had several Jewish family customers for our raw dairy products. One Orthodox lady asked if her Rabbi could make a farm visit? Sure, send him out.

Fortunately we weren’t raising pigs but we had about 40 bunny-rabbits running around. What’s not to like about rabbits? Our Texas Department of Health inspector’s only concern was keeping the chickens out of the milking parlor. I knew that Jews don’t eat pork because the pig has a cloven hoof but doesn’t chew his cud. Well, a rabbit has a cud but no cloven hoof.

At the end of the day, I was more informed on Kosher dietary traditions and the Rabbi gave us his seal of approval. A related incident occurred when an Indian lady wouldn’t buy our Chev and Feta cheese unless we used vegetarian rennet. It cost no more and the taste was the same, so we switched.

Owning a licensed Grade ‘A’ Raw Goat’s Milk dairy 50 miles outside of Houston, Texas is a great way to go broke, unless you can sell at the city farmers’ markets – $200 a week versus $4,000 a week. Twelve years after I abandoned the thrill of fighting city hall, to the best of my knowledge, California is the only state with retail raw dairy. One man, Mark McAfee, of Fresno based Organic Pastures  is the national spokesperson for raw dairy.

I had lost faith that the evils of industrialized agriculture could ever be rectified when Zerohedge posted this article by Black Swan author Nassim Taleb: 

The Most Intolerant Wins: Nassim Taleb Exposes The Dictatorship Of The Small Minority

This example of complexity hit me, ironically, as I was attending the New England Complex Systems institute summer barbecue. As the hosts were setting up the table and unpacking the drinks, a friend who was observant and only ate Kosher dropped by to say hello. I offered him a glass of that type of yellow sugared water with citric acid people sometimes call lemonade, almost certain that he would reject it owing to his dietary laws. He didn’t. He drank the liquid called lemonade, and another Kosher person commented: “liquids around here are Kosher”. We looked at the carton container. There was a fine print: a tiny symbol, a U inside a circle, indicating that it was Kosher. The symbol will be detected by those who need to know and look for the minuscule print. As to others, like myself, I had been speaking prose all these years without knowing, drinking Kosher liquids without knowing they were Kosher liquids.

” It suffices for an intransigent minority –a certain type of intransigent minorities –to reach a minutely small level, say three or four percent of the total population, for the entire population to have to submit to their preferences.”

The vegetarian population in the US 3.2 percent of  adults, or 7.3 million people, follow a vegetarian-based diet. The Jewish population about 4 million or 1.4%. So, there you have it the intransigent minorities are about to tip the scales in favor of real  food.

Kate Clow Lives in the Hood

My Queen of Diamonds friend was paying her first visit to our home, when she recognized that Kate Clow, founder of the Lycian coast trail lived in the neighborhood, We thought living next door to the mayor was pretty impressive but who is Kate Clow?

       

Kate Clow lived in the UK until 1989, when she took a job selling computer systems in Istanbul. In 1992, she moved to Antalya and started freelance work. This gave her scope to explore ancient roads, which form networks linking the centers of ancient civilizations of Turkey. Convinced that Turkey needed long distance walking routes, she connected a series of old roads to make Turkey’s first long distance walking path, the Lycian Way.

The ancient region of Lycia is now famous for walking, hiking, trekking, whichever! The establishment of the Lycian Way, Turkey’s first long distance footpath was set up during the nineties by Kate Clow an ex-pat residing in Antalya. The project won a conservation competition set up by the Garanti Bankasi and part of the prize was sponsoring the implementation of the route. Today people arrive from all over the world to hike the trail either independently or part of a package tour, bringing a boost to alternative tourism and local village economy.

Geographically, Lycia is a walker’s paradise with the limestone peaks of the Taurus Mountains sweeping down to a rugged shore of forested capes and secluded coves. Warm turquoise waters invite the intrepid trekker along coastal paths and ruins of ancient empires glorify the spectacular landscape. Snow melt gushes down narrow defiles to irrigate fertile plains and grazing goatherds define a biblical scene. Rock hewn paths connect forgotten cities and shepherd trails ascend to the ‘yayla’ summer pastures hidden amongst the mountain scree. Whether one wants to stroll through a meadow colored with red poppies or climb a ten thousand foot summit in snow and ice, Lycia has it all.

That 509 km translates to 300 miles, truth is if it was 3 mi we’d still go by car.  We went fours by bus from Antalya to Kas, Everybody must go to Kas, if it wasn’t 4 hours to the airport, we would move there.

Roy & Kay liked Demre, so much so, Roy had some kind of an epiphany viewing the tomb of Santa Claus, aka St. Nicholas. Those in the know say Finike is the place to be, only no expat’s going to brag on Facebook, they’ve been to FIN – e- Kuh.

We hired car/driver for almost 12 hours from Kas to Tlos (up at the top of the map under Taurus) for $75. Had to visit Tlos, home of Pegasus, but Patara, Xanthos, and Saklikent were way more interesting. Oh, when you come to visit, I want to take the ferry (25 minutes) from Kas to this little Greek island that starred in award winning Italian movie.