Mainframe to Smartphone

Latest IBM mainframe computer $1,000,000

New World Order Decentralization

I designed the Data Operations center of the New Jersey National Bank in Ewing Township, NJ in 1979 which had a single IBM Mainframe at the time.


By 1978 Wang was the largest worldwide supplier of CRT word processing systems, with fifty thousand users. In a few years 80% of the 2,000 largest US firms had bought Wang equipment. At one time, it was said, every secretary in America swore by Wang products.


The girls from 18 to maybe 40, married the Wang 2200. The design, engineering & construction company employed 2,500 professionals 2,000 ‘gearheads’ and 500 architects. Our customers the big banks and the airlines had their IBM mainframes, the engineers had their mini-computers and the girls had the latest and greatest word processing technology. The architects? Well we still had our T-Squares & Triangles.

Back at our corporate office we had an HP 3000 mini-computer which the engineers used in mystic ways to do structural calcs and project scheduling.
Long about 1985 the California office rented a dozen Auto-Trol CAD machines, the leading edge in computer aided the design. Now everybody could throw away their T-Squares, triangles and even their drafting tables. Nope! Nobody over 20 knew how to use a graphics computer. High school kids took over and the AE&C professionals were too old to learn new tricks.


Around 1980, Bill Gates gave Microsoft, the company he founded, a clear mission: “A computer on every desk and in every home.”

Steve Ballmer (left) and Bill Gates, both from Microsoft, speak next to a fountain at the annual PC Forum, Phoenix, Arizona, February 16-19, 1986. (Photo by Ann E. Yow-Dyson/Getty Images)

Having graduated from high school in 1961 and architecture in 1968, I got a positive response from USAID to be a Computer Construction Management consultant to the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture. The fact that I didn’t know anything about agriculture, a little about construction in the field and not sure what to do after I turned the computer on, were merely details. I did reference my design of the New Jersey National Bank computer operations center.

When, in 1985, I witnessed the MOA secretary, typing in Arabic from right to left, on her IBM PC MS DOS operating system, I saw the Prophet Bill Gates vision: “A computer on every desk and in every home.” was just around the 1995 introduction of AOL.


There are about 2 billion smartphones in the world today and that is set to rise to 6 billion by 2020. 6 billion smartphones represents huge computational capacity, and often that capacity is underutilized. While worries are growing that we are ‘addicted to’ or ‘overusing’ or smartphones, the fact of the matter is that are smartphones spend most of their existence in our pocket, in a bag or on a table somewhere. Cars are an analogous example. During their lifetime, cars spend 95% of their time parked and only 5% of their time actually driving.
But why is this important? While we are producing more data than ever, we’re struggling to analyze much of it. According to a recent EMC report, only 1% of data produced is every analyzed but 37% of data would be useful to analyze. Increasing our processing power by leveraging smartphone downtime would go a long way to making data analysis faster and more efficient. The idea is based on the concept of distributed computing. A distributed system is a group of interconnected computers working towards the same goals. A distributed system can divided tasks between these different computers to help get work done faster and more efficiently.

Power to the people now everyone can have an IBM Mainframe in their pocket with access to the Cloud. The New World Order is controlled by the end user, deciding what they want to see, hear, and do.